Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Women & aircraft: centennial of the first female flight over the Channel

Note that AvioNews is based in Italy and the writing of the article reflects someone to whom English is not the first language.

From AvioNews: Women & aircraft: centennial of the first female flight over the Channel
London, United Kingdom - An exhibition in honour of Harriet Quimby

(WAPA) - Hundred year ago Harriet Quimby, first woman to gain a pilot license in the United States, flew between English coast to the French one in spite of wind, rain and inaccurate maps.

This historical event has been celebrated yesterday in Kent by more than 100 women came from all Europe, Canada and United States where the entire flight will be realized again.

Actually Quimby took-off on April 16 1912 facing many difficulties during the one hour flight (precisely 56 minutes), forced to land 25 miles away from her true destination in Calais, France.

This record, exceptional at time, received little attention due the Titanic sunk just one day before (April 15, 1912).

Still very young, Harriet Quimby died 37, during the flight which should have been her triumph, the third Boston Aviation Meeting. Harriet was pushed out when the aircraft unexpectedly pitched forward for reasons still unknown. William Willard, the organizer of the event, flying together with the pilot also died on impact. (Avionews)

No comments: